Lilian Broca

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ARTIST STATEMENT FOR THE QUEEN ESTHER MOSAIC SERIES
One tessera at a time, painstaking, laborious, such is the truth of mosaic art. Opus Veritas.
- Massimiliano Salviati

Throughout my career I have explored relationships and the nature of the human condition through symbols and metaphors. The Queen Esther Series deals with sacrifice and I chose the biblical Queen Esther as a prototype for the courageous, selfless heroine who wins against all odds. As a young woman, Esther fulfilled her role as leader at a time of crisis with intelligence, persistence and dedication. Today we view her as a role model and as such, she contributes significantly to the status of women in society.

The bright, seductive colours of Venetian glass and smalti I used in creating mosaics many years ago, suddenly beckoned me. The coincidental fact that mosaics were first mentioned in the biblical Book of Esther (within the description of King Ahasuerus’s palace) contributed to my decision to further explore this unique art form. In our present Post-Modernist society executing the Esther Series in an ancient method with added contemporary symbolism seems most appropriate.

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ARTIST STATEMENT FOR THE JUDITH MOSAIC SERIES

After finishing the Esther mosaics which followed the transformation of a shy, frightened and passive young teenager into a self-empowered young Queen, I opted for another powerful figure from biblical times, who, like Esther, saves her people from complete annihilation through courageous deeds that require much self sacrifice.

Judith in many respects is the flip side of Esther. The story begins with her as a mature woman, a widow with no children who confidently assures the victory of her people through her machinations and with divine help. Unlike Esther she is a warrior from the start. There is no transformation of personality here, only sheer determination and what appears to be an invulnerability to fear or intimidation. Her strong and energetic personality calls for action images full of movement and dramatic gestures, a complete opposite approach to the Queen Esther's static compositions, quieter poses and expressive but not overly emotional facial expressions.

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